Frivolous Fangirlie Fun

Apr 15
Day 3 - A Book I Love:

A plot description from Wikipedia: 

The protagonist is Tom, a young chimney sweep, who falls into a river after encountering an upper-class girl named Ellie and being chased out of her house. There he dies and is transformed into a “water baby”, as he is told by a caddis fly—an insect that sheds its skin—and begins his moral education. The story is thematically concerned with Christian redemption, though Kingsley also uses the book to argue that England treats its poor badly, and to question child labour, among other themes.

I did have an abridged version of this story, which was already 125 years old or so when I was very little and used to make my mom read this to me over and over and over again. She didn’t even really like it, I don’t think. And I can understand that. It always made me so mad that the pretty rich girl was being raised to be such a snob, and Tom was chased off like he was a criminal. They were just little kids. But I think on some level I thought that if I kept hearing it, it would somehow all make sense. And Tom did become a water baby, which seemed pretty cool. I guess it was foreshadowing my future as an English major that I was trying to analyze a Victorian-era satirical didactic moral fable at the age of 4. Yes, I was always that level of nerd.

Day 3 - A Book I Love:

A plot description from Wikipedia: 

The protagonist is Tom, a young chimney sweep, who falls into a river after encountering an upper-class girl named Ellie and being chased out of her house. There he dies and is transformed into a “water baby”, as he is told by a caddis fly—an insect that sheds its skin—and begins his moral education. The story is thematically concerned with Christian redemption, though Kingsley also uses the book to argue that England treats its poor badly, and to question child labour, among other themes.

I did have an abridged version of this story, which was already 125 years old or so when I was very little and used to make my mom read this to me over and over and over again. She didn’t even really like it, I don’t think. And I can understand that. It always made me so mad that the pretty rich girl was being raised to be such a snob, and Tom was chased off like he was a criminal. They were just little kids. But I think on some level I thought that if I kept hearing it, it would somehow all make sense. And Tom did become a water baby, which seemed pretty cool. I guess it was foreshadowing my future as an English major that I was trying to analyze a Victorian-era satirical didactic moral fable at the age of 4. Yes, I was always that level of nerd.
  1. sassyyetsimple posted this